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Under 11 Rules


Rules/Regulation
KEY STAGE 2 MINI RUGBY UNDER 11

11.1 The object of the game is to score a try (5 points) and conversion (2 points) in accordance with the Laws of the Game.

11.2 Teams will be made up of twelve players, five (and no more) of whom will be forwards, with the remaining seven forming the back line.

11.3 At this age, the game will start with, and recommence the second half with, a kick-off from the centre of the field. All other restarts will be with a drop kick. The kicker’s team must be behind the ball until it has been kicked and the receiving team must be at least 7 metres back from the ball.

LAW 13 - KICK-OFF AND RESTART KICKS If, from the kick-off, the ball is kicked directly into touch, the opposition has the choice of: • The kick-off to be taken again • Their throw-in to a scrum at the centre spot • Accepting the kick and contesting a line-out at the half-way line.

If, from the kick-off, the ball goes directly into in-goal and is then immediately touched down or made ‘dead’, or the ball goes into touch-in-goal, the opposition has the choice of: • The kick-off to be taken again • Their throw-in to a scrum at the centre spot.

LAW 20 - SCRUM The scrummage will be made up of five players from each team - the front row (a row of three players, and no more, i.e. a prop on either side of the hooker) and two locks forming the second row. The locks must bind to each other using the inside arm, with the outside arm around the hips (not between the legs) of the front row (props).

The front rows from each team will bind together approximately half a metre apart, and the locks will bind to each other and to the props. Each prop will then touch the upper arm of his opponent, and then pause before the engagement. The referee will talk the players through the engagement procedure in the sequence Crouch, Touch, Pause, and Engage. On the grounds of safety, it is important that the referee manages the engagement of every scrum in this way.

SCRUM SAFETY GUIDANCE FOR REFEREES AND COACHES • Front rows must not be allowed to charge at each other • If they start to engage too close together, and with necks and backs bent they must be stopped and the scrummage reformed • Props’ body positions should be parallel to the touchline (not boring in) • Locks must bind round the hips of the props - not through the props’ legs • There should be no downward pressure exerted by hands or arms • If the scrummage collapses, the whistle should immediately be blown and the appropriate penalty awarded, or the scrummage reset • If a player is persistently involved in collapsing or illegal binding he must be replaced • If a player’s lack of technique or strength is a danger then he should be replaced • In the absence of any adequate replacement, there is no choice (on safety grounds) other than to go to an uncontested scrummage. This applies at any age level. In an uncontested scrum the teams do not contest for the ball. The team throwing in the ball must win it. Neither team is allowed to push the other team away from the mark.

In all other situations, the Laws of the Game of Rugby Union Football apply with the following exceptions:
Under no circumstances is the scrum to be: • Pushed more than 1.5 metres towards either try line Penalty: A free kick against the side, which pushes the scrum at the original spot.

• Wheeled more than 45 degrees Penalty: If a team intentionally wheels a scrum, a penalty kick will be awarded against that side. If the scrum is wheeled more than 45 degrees without a penalty kick award, the scrum will be reset with the same team throwing the ball in.

The scrum-half not throwing the ball into the scrum may remain alongside his opponent. He must not move beyond the middle-line of ths scrum until the ball has emerged from the scrummage or an opponent has placed his hand on the ball. In the event of a strike against the head, the scrum-half who has thrown the ball in is similarly restricted in not following the ball.

11.4 If the ball or player carrying the ball goes out of play, a contested line-out at the point at which the ball or players crossed the touchline will take place. A quick throw-in is permitted.

THE LINE-OUT • The line-out will be made up of two, three or four players from each team, plus the player throwing the ball in and an immediate opponent, who must stand within the 2 metre area, and one player from either side in a position to receive the ball (i.e. scrum-half). Both the thrower-in and his immediate opponent are able to take an active role in the game as soon as the ball has been touched by one of the players contesting the line-out. • The line-out will extend from 2 to 10 metres from the touchline. Should the ball be thrown beyond 10 metres, the opposition will be awarded the throw. Should the opposition then throw beyond 10 metres, a scrum will be awarded to the side originally throwing in. All ‘peeling off’ movements must be close to and parallel with the line-out. Players must keep moving. • Lifting / supporting is prohibited at this level (i.e. a player may not bind to a jumper until he / she has returned to the ground). • The offside line for all players not participating in the line-out (all players other than those described under Rule 11.4 above) will be 7 metres back from the line of touch parallel to the goal-line and they must remain behind that offside line until the line-out has ended.

LAW 19 - LINE-OUT The line-out begins when the ball leaves the hands of the player throwing it in. The line-out ends when the ball, or a player carrying it, leaves the line-out. This includes the following: • When the ball is thrown, knocked or kicked out of the line-out • When a line-out player hands the ball to a player who is peeling close to and parallel to the line. • When a ruck or maul develops in a line-out, and both feet of all the players in the ruck or maul move beyond the line of touch • When the ball becomes unplayable in a line-out. Play restarts with a scrum.

11.5 FOLLOWING A TACKLE: Full tackling, as opposed to the touch tackle, is now permitted in all age groups from under-9 upwards. The tackler must immediately release the tackled player and get up or move away from the tackled player and the ball. The tackler must get up before playing the ball.

The tackled player must immediately pass or release the ball and must get up or move away from the ball. The tackled player may put the ball on the ground in any direction, or may push the ball along the ground in any direction, except forward (towards the opposition try line). providing this is done immediately. Any player who has the ball and is on their feet (except in a maul) can be tackled as laid down in Law 15 of the Laws of the Game.

At a tackle, or near to a tackle, other players who play the ball must do so from behind the ball and from behind the tackled player, or the tackler closest to those player’s goal-line.

PENALTY KICK Any player who first gains possession of the ball at the tackle or near to it may be tackled by an opposition player, providing that player does so from behind the ball and from behind the tackled player or tackler nearest that player’s goal-line. Penalty: Penalty kick.

Note 1: Any tackle level with or above the armpit is to be considered a high tackle. Penalty: Penalty kick to the ball-carrier’s team.

Note 2: The scrag type tackle (i.e. swinging the player round by the shirt) is to be considered dangerous play and must be penalised. Penalty: Penalty kick to the ball-carrier’s team.

Note 3: Where a ruck or maul occurs, the offside line for players not in the ruck or maul is at the hindmost foot on their side of the ruck or maul. Penalty: A penalty kick to the non-offending team.

LAW NOTES: DEFINITION

LAW 17 - MAUL A maul occurs when a player carrying the ball is held by one or more opponents, and one or more of the ball-carrier’s team-mates bind on to the ball-carrier. It is helpful if the referee calls ‘maul formed’. • All the players involved are on their feet. • A maul ends successfully when the ball or a player with the ball leaves the maul. • A maul ends successfully when the ball is on the ground, or is on or over the goal-line. • A maul ends unsuccessfully if the ball becomes unplayable or collapses (not as a result of foul play) and a scrum is awarded. • When a maul remains stationary or has stopped moving forward for more than 5 seconds, but the ball is being moved and the referee can see it, a reasonable time is allowed for the ball to emerge. If it does not emerge within a reasonable time, a scrum is ordered. It is helpful in all maul situations if the referee calls “use it or lose it” prior to awarding a scrum. • When a maul has stopped moving forward it may start moving forward again providing it does so within 5 seconds. If the maul stops moving forward for a second time, and if the ball is being moved and the referee can see it, a reasonable time is allowed for the ball to emerge. A scrum is awarded if it does not emerge within a reasonable time.
Scrum following maul The ball is thrown in by the team not in possession when the maul began. If the referee cannot decide which team had possession, the team moving before the maul stopped throws in the ball. If neither team was moving forward, the attacking team throws in the ball.

Summary At least three players form the maul, all on their feet; the ball-carrier and one player from each team.

LAW 16 - RUCK A ruck occurs where one or more players from each team, who are on their feet, in physical contact, close around the ball on the ground. Players are rucking when they are in a ruck and using their feet to try to win or keep possession of the ball, without being guilty of foul play. • A ruck ends successfully when the ball leaves the ruck, or when the ball is on or over the goal-line. • A ruck ends unsuccessfully when the ball becomes unplayable and a scrum is awarded.

Scrum following ruck The team that was moving forward immediately before the ball became unplayable in the ruck throws in the ball. If neither team was moving forward, or if the referee cannot decide which team was moving forward before the ball became unplayable in the ruck, the team that was moving forward before the ruck began throws in the ball. If neither team was moving forward, then the attacking team throws in the ball. Before the referee blows the whistle for a scrum, the referee allows a reasonable amount of time for the ball to emerge. If the ruck stops moving, or if the referee decides that the ball will probably not emerge within a reasonable time, the referee must order a scrum.

Summary The ball is on the ground with at least one player from each team on their feet, close to the ball, and in physical contact. It is helpful if the referee calls “ruck formed”.

11.6 If, after a tackle, the ball becomes unplayable, a contested scrummage is awarded. The scrummage is awarded to the team that was moving forward immediately prior to the tackle or, if no team was moving forward, to the attacking team (the team in the opponents’ half of the pitch). At all penalty kicks, the offending team must retire 7 metres towards their own goal-line from the place where the penalty kick is awarded (see 11.11).

11.7 A player must not hand-off or fend-off an opponent in any way. A hand-off or fend-off is defined as ‘any movement of the hand, arm or ball to ward off a would-be tackler’. Penalty: A penalty kick to the opposition.

Note: Players are recommended to carry the ball in two hands.

11.8 All the Laws of the Game pertaining to kicking in open play will apply, with the following exceptions: • Players may only kick the ball out of their hands • The offside zone ahead of the kicker is 7, rather than 10, metres. Kicking the ball when it is on the ground other than for starts, restarts and tap penalties (often called fly hacking) is not permitted. Penalty: A penalty kick to the non-offending team.

11.9 After a try has been scored, the team can attempt to convert the try into a goal. The kick at goal will take place from anywhere in front of the posts.

11.10 After a try or goal has been scored, the game will restart with a drop kick from the centre of the half-way line.

11.11 When an infringement occurs, as per the Laws of the Game, a penalty or free kick will be awarded. The referee will make a mark for the kick. The opposition will retire quickly to 7 metres from the mark. If the kick is taken so quickly that opponents have no opportunity to retire, they will not be penalised for this. However, they must continue to retire, until a team-mate who was standing 7 metres from the mark has run in front of them. The opposing team must not do anything to delay the penalty kick or obstruct the kicker. Any infringement by the opposing team Results in a second penalty 7 metres in front of the mark for the first kick. On the second occasion the kick will not be taken until all opponents have retired 7 metres. No penalty or free kick can be taken within 7 metres of the goal-line.

11.12 After any stoppage not covered in the Rules, the game shall restart with a scrummage to the team who was moving forward, or, if neither team was moving forward, to the team who was last in possession of the ball.

11.13 A game will be made up of two equal halves, each of not more than 20 minutes duration. During the interval, coaches should take adequate time to talk to, encourage, coach and explain the game to players.

TECHNICAL DETAILS

1. A size 4 ball should be used.

2. Tackling must be introduced progressively, using the stages described in the Mini/Midi Foundation or Mini/Midi Level 1 Coaches Handbooks.

3. The formation of the scrummage must be introduced in a progressive way following the stages described in ‘Even Better Rugby’ with great emphasis placed on body position, foot placement, binding, throwing the ball into the scrummage and hooking techniques.

4. In order to give a balance between coaching and playing, fixtures should be arranged to allow at least one Sunday coaching / training session between matches. At this age, players may play a maximum of fourteen fixtures and not more than three festivals (one in the Constituent Body and two others) in any season. The emphasis remains on providing the children with an enjoyable introduction to the skills of the game. Competition is of secondary importance.

5. If there is an insufficient number of players to play Midi Rugby (12-a-side), they should play Mini Rugby (9-a-side) still in their under-12 age group. Where clubs have large squads, additional fixtures / festivals might be arranged, provided that no player plays in more than the maximum number.

6. Definitions:

(a) Fixture / Triangular Fixture: The playing of Mini Rugby between teams of different schools / clubs, not more than three schools / clubs being involved together on any one day.

(b) Festival / Competition: The playing of Mini Rugby between more than three teams of different schools / clubs on a league basis, normally to establish a winner, all games taking place being part of one event.
At festivals no player is to play in more than 5 games.

Under 11 / under 12 match durations Fixture: 20 minutes each way • 1 game = 40 minutes Triangular: 15 minutes each way • 2 games = 60 minutes Festival / tournament: 7 minutes each way • Maximum of 5 games = 70 minutes

In all age groups matches must not be consecutive. A minimum period of 15 minutes should elapse after a game prior to a team playing again.

7. Games should be shortened if one side is scoring too freely (i.e. if the points difference rises to more than 30).

8. The emphasis should be on enjoyment. The children should be encouraged to enjoy the physical skills of running, passing and evasion, and they should be coached according to material available in the Mini/Midi Foundation or Level 1 coaching courses.

9. A practical coaching session that includes talks and videos, etc., should last no longer than two hours with a maximum of 40 minutes devoted to match play.

10. On match days against outside opposition, a coaching session should normally precede the match. Matches should be used as an extension of the coaching session, with the emphasis being on the quality of performance rather than the result.

11. The RFU strongly recommends the wearing of mouthguards. Ideally mouthguards should be custom made from a dental impression of the teeth. Individuals may choose to wear shinguards.

11. Coaches and Referees are advised to check studs and other approved clothing before training sessions, games or tournaments in accordance with the Laws of the Game.

In this version of the game, there is: • NO HAND-OFF / FEND-OFF

 
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